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MRS DESPATCHER(PART II)


CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS POST…
Eighteen months later….


I was beginning to like my work. It was a challenge sometimes. I had learnt to go beyond boundaries. The dreams which had eluded me once, were dawning as reality now. I had my taste of success and as they say nothing succeeds like success. I had developed a knack for solving my own problems.
One day , I chanced by a couple who were seated in a corner of the quaint little coffee shop. I couldn’t believe my eyes…. Divya and Sandip…here of all places. I couldn’t help but confront them. Divya was warmer than ever before and Sandip… I knew he was feeling a bit coy..its so typical of him. But I was more than surprised when he asked me to join them. Though I didn’t refuse, they found me going after five minutes. I invited them for lunch on Sunday.
It was a fine Sunday morning and my guests were sharp on time. Divya offered me help in the kitchen and I chose not to refuse. My books kept Sandip busy. She could read my mind and went on with her tale- an unexpected wedding, days of gloom and finally a dab of happiness. A few days after her wedding Divya encouraged Sandip to try something better. He took leave from his job in the town. Sandip had excellent language skills-even though born and brought up in almost rural settings. He began to freelance in some magazines and simultaneously took a correspondence course in journalism. Divya helped him all through by teaching a few children at home. Now,she is an instructor at some online forum for teaching school students. Sandip was the city correspondent of a reputed magazine.
Suddenly, tears welled up in Divya’s eyes. Before I asked her, she said,” Almost all my friends at college had nicknamed me as "Mrs.Despatcher" . Sandip was infuriated and then all of this happened. "
I didn’t want to hear anymore. I blessed the “friends at college ” whose taunts unleashed so much potential in these two ordinary, simpletons.

Comments

Chriz said…
A Rakhi sister married her rakhi brother.. it happened in my college...
Arnab Majumdar said…
"All's well that ends well."

This post truly proves it. :)

Cheers...
Ria said…
tht was such a beautiful ending!! good one. i simply love ur narration.
Rocky said…
lovely ending :)
wish i could write so
Mayz said…
i hope there is a 3rd part coz m lovin this series
Phoenix said…
is there a next part? is this is it?? i so want a next part... :)
ABHISHEK SiM said…
last line is wonderful - and now i understand the title.
Priya Joyce said…
basics r always simple..I loved the ending re :)

:)
ANWESA said…
@chriz,
well,dat was not the case here..
sumtyms lyf plays strange games..
ANWESA said…
@arnab majumdar,
thanx...keep blogging...
ANWESA said…
@ria,
thanx dear!!!!!
ANWESA said…
@rocky,
mayb u can write still better...
thanx 4 reading!!!!
ANWESA said…
@mayz,
thanx 4 liking it so much but this was d concluding part...
ANWESA said…
@phoenix,
thanx dear but sadly,der r no parts to follow...
ANWESA said…
@abhishek sim,
thanx...
ANWESA said…
@lil' priya,
thanx dear!!!
Harshita said…
:)

I think bullies shud get some credit, they turn every person they call a loser into a winner with their constant pestering and themselves they end up as'losers'.

Mrs Despatcher is a perfect example of the same and it also tells how God saves the best for the last :)

Optimistic and beautiful story from you, Anwesa. Please blog often now.
AD said…
your pour is so classy it doesnt wet me but surely i m inside out soaked!
whaooo!
keep up the power !
Suree said…
hey is this a real incident ..
or u just fiction...

any ways.. its good ..

would be great if it is real ...

Urs
suree
Kido said…
The narration is good :) But the ending's better :)
яノςんム said…
lovely :)

finding happiness in unfavorable consequences is the essence of life :)

and how beautifully narrated!! kudos!!
ANWESA said…
@harshita,
ur reply is d gist of the story.as goes the saying-every dark cloud has a silver lining.
i'll surely try 2 blog more frequently.i was offline due to unavoidable circumstances.
ANWESA said…
@AD,
thanx dear!!!!it was gr8 havin u here...:D
ANWESA said…
@suree,
4 me,its pure fiction..it maybe real 4 sum1 else...thanx 4 reading!!!
ANWESA said…
@kido,
thanx!!i shall try to polish my narration in subsequent attempts..
ANWESA said…
@richa,
thanx dear!! there's nothing like life..
ApocalypsE said…
That was bloody brilliant... Nice story... It was obvious in the first part she would marry sandip...

Anyways thanks for happily spent five minutes...
ANWESA said…
@apocalypse,
thanx 4 reading!!!
The Rat... said…
:-)

cant just stop smiling.. loved it... Love wins YAy
ANWESA said…
@the rat,
thanx!!!!!
Kido said…
My apologies if I haven't been able to make myself clear... I meant, it was a good read, but the ending was the best part... :)

Also, I don't think I'm even close to you in narration, let alone suggesting something to you...

Cheers!!! :)
ANWESA said…
@kido,
no apologies dear!!!i just luvd havin u here..keep blogging...
Velu said…
Liked your simple narration of the tale. The use of the narrator to describe the story in the third person also allowed you to express those self doubts in the first part. I always find it a bit difficult which mode to use for my short stories.

Drop by my blog sometimes,

Cheers
Velu
ANWESA said…
@velu,
thanx 4 reading the post! i'll surely visit ur blog.

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